V-Cap: Welcome to the War

E: And lo, the sky was crowded with Angels, heralding the return of V, the highly anticipated reboot of the classic 80s sci fi series.  Not an moment of new footage had been seen since last November.  Surely the lengthy break since an episode last aired will have afforded the crew the time to figure out what made those first four episode less thrilling than the camptastic original?

No. Sorry.  Still disappointed.

We did get some revelations this week, but some how, there’s no umph to them. How is that possible?  We learned some seriously crazy stuff, but in the end it just feels like the creators trying to shock without changing up their style that much.

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LOST Review: The Package

M: Here is the problem with this being the final half of the final season of Lost.  An episode like The Package, if it were in on of the previous seasons, would be perfectly acceptable.  If this weren’t the last season, and we had no finish line approaching rapidly, we would watch it and enjoy the difference between the Pottersville version of Sun and Jin, where they are married and have a baby, but have been separated for three years, and the Bedford Falls version where they are not married, are sneaking around not quite behind her father’s back, and get busted.  But this is the final season, and the end of the show is less than two months away.  Last week in Ab Aeterno we got not just an outstanding episode and story, but probably the most answers from any one episode in the history of the show.  This week?  Not so much. Continue reading

Castle Review: “Boom!”

C: This week’s Castle episode, “Boom!,” was the conclusion to last week’s dramatic cliffhanger, which ended with a bomb decimating Kate Beckett’s apartment with her inside.

E: I was totally convinced that she couldn’t really have been in her apartment – but there she was, hiding in the cast iron bathtub.  Huh.  The gratuitous shower scene from last week?  Actually saved her life.

C: Yeah… it’s not quite surviving a nuclear bomb by shutting yourself in a refrigerator, but it did strain my credulity a bit.

M: Cast iron bath tubs being indestructible and bomb-proof have been a Hollywood staple for decades, so I was fine with it.  What I couldn’t figure out at first was how the explosion didn’t just explode into the top of the tub, but they wrapped that up neatly with the door being blasted off the frame and onto the top of the tub.  Not as convincing, but certainly not as bad as Sam Jackson happening to see Bruce Willis getting shot out of the sewer as he’s driving by at 80 mph in Die Hard 3.

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Chuck Review: “Chuck Vs. the American Hero”

E: Tonight’s episode centered around Chuck’s determination to win Sarah back and take her away to Rome as part of his new team, and Shaw’s determination to take out the Ring, even at the expense of his own life.  I confess, if I’d known the title in advance I’d have been very disappointed.  I’d have thought they were referring to the cult 80s tv show (a family favorite, of course) rather than Shaw’s Viking/Klingon-like desire to die gloriously in battle. (M: Perhaps today IS a good day to die!)

So, first Chuck goes to D.C., meets General Beckman in person (who kicks him a little for acting like a puppy, and then uses Tim Gunn’s immortal phrase to set him back on his feet – “make it work!”) and gets his assignment as a expatriot playboy living an astounding villa near Rome.  Then he flies back to Burbank to plead for Sarah to join his team.  No luck at first, but he does get Casey, Morgan, and Awesome in his corner.  Casey and Morgan want to go to Rome with him, and Awesome wants to go to Africa with Ellie, and so they all decide they need to sabotage Sarah’s budding relationship with Shaw in order to help Chuck make it all happen. Of course, when you mix in the Ring and its obsession with Shaw, events get pretty out of control.  We end up with a kamikaze mission, an assignation at a train station, and a kidnapping.  They’re setting up quite the episode for next week!

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Masterpiece Classics Review: Sharpe’s Challenge

E: Though the series has run for some time, last night’s episode (which first aired back in 2006) was my first foray into the Sharpe cannon. Our intrepid hero is a retired Colonel in the British Army, now farming in France.  He’s a handsome devil of low birth but high intelligence and morals (and, of course, is played by Sean Bean, which is a plus from every conceivable angle).  It’s a bit funny for an American to cheer for a redcoat, but it works.  This installment puts Sharpe in an exotic locale complete with vixens, damsels in distress, murder and rebellion most foul, and a few burning questions.  Is the Northern English accent kryptonite for American women, or does it only make us swoon when it’s voiced by Sean Bean and Richard Armitage?  Were severed heads really the email of the early 19th century?  And is Padma Lakshmi (better known as a reality tv host) a sex bomb, or just a bomb?

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ETV: Project Runway and Models of the Runway – Hey, That’s My Fabric

E: Well, I don’t think I like that one bit.

I love the idea of this challenge, though.  Vivienne Tam – a designer who has sold out to corporate America – has come to promote a system where they get to design their own fabrics. They can make whatever they want using their fabric, they get two days (the first to design the fabric and shop for supplemental material at Mood), and they get to do something super cool while pimping the new HP touch screen machines.  They can draw with a stylus, their fingers, or even paint brushes.  How awesome is that?  They’re all drooling over the chance.

But.

But, ugh.

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ETV:Grey’s Anatomy – Suicide is Painless

E: Killing yourself might be painless, but letting someone else die?  Now that’s difficult.

Or so is the contention of this week’s episode of Grey’s Anatomy.  I’m not quite sure how the writer thinks they know that: all we truly know about death is its effect on the living. And Owen, in serious combat flashback mode, is deeply affected. We move from the light humor of the last few episodes to Owen’s back story – from visions of him playing soccer at a MASH-like desert camp (surprise, since they’ve cribbed the episode title from the MASH theme song) with Teddy and some red shirt friends, to the darkest heart of his pain.

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